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Quebec Anglophone community

 
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anyb
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 26, 2007 7:33 am    Post subject: Quebec Anglophone community Reply with quote

First of all, thank you all for answering my last week question on the future of the Quebec Anglophone community. I understand perfectly Anglophones' frustration not to be able to be served in English in areas where language laws permit! Wouldn't you say, however, that on the whole, with the erosion of the WASP group, Anglophones more readily turn to French now?
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 26, 2007 4:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think so. Quebec's language policy interestingly works too well. They probably view McGill as the only enemy right now!
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 22, 2007 3:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The anglophone community in Quebec is dwindling away, according to a report released Wednesday.

The report, published by the Quebec Community Groups Network, suggests anglophones continue to be at a disadvantage compared to their French-speaking neighbours. They face increased poverty, higher unemployment rates, a weakened presence in politics and live in a community with few effective leaders, the non-profit group concluded in the report.

Based on statistics from 2001, the report found that 9.2 per cent of anglophones living in Quebec were unemployed and that they were 24 per cent more likely to have difficulty finding a job compared to francophones.

In the political sphere, there's just one Anglo cabinet minister but the province says it is doing a lot to encourage their English-speaking residents.

"We have done things for the English institutions, we've done things for Concordia, for McGill, we've done things for the new McGill teaching hospitals," said Liberal MNA Geoffrey Kelley.

The president of the English School Board Association agreed, pointing to several different industries where gains have been made.

"We have leadership in education, leadership in social services, in health services, we're past the point as a community of screaming and crying 'oh, woe is me'," said Marcus Tabachnick.

The English-speaking community started to shrink not long after Bill 101, a Quebec law passed in 1974 to make French the province's only official language. The exodus continued after both referendums.

The QCGN, which supports Anglo organizations, spoke to 400 people for their study.

"They felt disenfranchised," said Sylvia Martin-LaForge, the QCGN's director general, in an interview with CTV Montreal. "English speaking communities want to be considered at the front end of policy making."

Most Anglos don't have the desire to get involved in politics, said Eric Maldoff, head of the former head of Alliance Quebec, a now defunct Anglo lobby group that once boasted 40,000 members.

"Most of our community are moderate people, they don't consider themselves highly political and they don't want to be involved in highly political events, so they all went."

Still, some Anglos say they like living in Quebec just fine.

"I think it's a very good place to live. The English people still have their identity and they helped build this province and this country and we certainly feel welcome here," one anglo resident said.
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PostPosted: Tue May 03, 2011 2:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Anonymous wrote:
The anglophone community in Quebec is dwindling away, according to a report released Wednesday.

The report, published by the Quebec Community Groups Network, suggests anglophones continue to be at a disadvantage compared to their French-speaking neighbours. They face increased poverty, higher unemployment rates, a weakened presence in politics and live in a community with few effective leaders, the non-profit group concluded in the report.

Based on statistics from 2001, the report found that 9.2 per cent of anglophones living in Quebec were unemployed and that they were 24 per cent more likely to have difficulty finding a job compared to francophones.

In the political sphere, there's just one Anglo cabinet minister but the province says it is doing a lot to encourage their English-speaking residents.

"We have done things for the English institutions, we've done things for Concordia, for McGill, we've done things for the new McGill teaching hospitals," said Liberal MNA Geoffrey Kelley.

The president of the English School Board Association agreed, pointing to several different industries where gains have been made.

"We have leadership in education, leadership in social services, in health services, we're past the point as a community of screaming and crying 'oh, woe is me'," said Marcus Tabachnick.

The English-speaking community started to shrink not long after Bill 101, a Quebec law passed in 1974 to make French the province's only official language. The exodus continued after both referendums.

The QCGN, which supports Anglo organizations, spoke to 400 people for their study.

"They felt disenfranchised," said Sylvia Martin-LaForge, the QCGN's director general, in an interview with CTV Montreal. "English speaking communities want to be considered at the front end of policy making."

Most Anglos don't have the desire to get involved in politics, said Eric Maldoff, head of the former head of Alliance Quebec, a now defunct Anglo lobby group that once boasted 40,000 members.

"Most of our community are moderate people, they don't consider themselves highly political and they don't want to be involved in highly political events, so they all went."

Still, some Anglos say they like living in Quebec just fine.

"I think it's a very good place to live. The English people still have their identity and they helped build this province and this country and we certainly feel welcome here," one anglo resident said.
HELLO RANDOM PPL
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Anglo
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PostPosted: Wed May 04, 2011 2:35 am    Post subject: Anglophone community Reply with quote

Ethnic cleansing, oppression, culture of coerced silence to the Quebec tyranny, to minimize and disregard the basic human rights of 2.5 million Anglophones for the appeasement of Quebec separatists is wrong, no matter how you try to candy coat it. Oppression is oppression, you are not fooling anyone, especially the minority Anglophone community, who live in Quebec; and we have to witness the facade that continues for decades, while our politicians turn a blind eye to the injustice for their own self serving gains. Re: Marcus Tabachnick ,“we're past the point as a community of screaming and crying 'oh, woe is me,". He is right, we Anglophones are beyond the “screaming and crying, woe is me”. We are about action and ....look out for Anglophone me...in an era of cyber communications; we won’t just be screaming....we will be documenting all the injustice, the discrimination, the deceitfulness, the manipulation of a population, which jeopardizes our children’s future. There is no more woe’s me...We are empowered to show the world exactly what Canada stands for, linguistic apartheid, discrimination and tyrannical rule.
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